Praying for Wisdom

By Adrian Rogers

Date Preached: November 1, 1981

Main Scripture Text: James 1:1–8

“If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.”

James 1:5

Outline

Introduction

I. The Freedom to Pray

II. The Faith to Pray

III. The Firmness to Pray

Conclusion

Introduction

I want us to find the Book of James chapter 1—the Book of James chapter 1. We’re going to be talking today about “How to Pray for Wisdom”—“How to Pray for Wisdom.” James chapter 1, beginning in verse 1: “James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, to the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad, greeting. My brethren, count it all joy when you fall in to divers temptations; knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing. If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord. A double minded man is unstable in all his ways” (James 1:1–8). “How to Pray for Wisdom.”

Sooner or later, you’re going to face one of the tests of life. That’s what James is talking about here when he says, “Count it all joy when you fall into divers temptations,” in verse 2. The word temptations there does not mean a solicitation to do evil, but it means “testings, trials, heartaches, difficulties, and misunderstandings.” They’re going to happen to you, and in order for you to pass this test, it’s going to take more than knowledge.

Now if you’re in school and you have to pass a test, then you can study for that test and you pass that test with knowledge. But this is a test that you’re going to have to pass with wisdom. And you can have a head full of knowledge and fail this test. It will take the wisdom of God to pass this test. And so after James talks to us about the trials, the temptations, the falsities of life, then he talks to us about wisdom: what it is and how to get it, and how to pray for wisdom. I want you to pay attention, because sooner or later you’re going to be asked to answer one of these tests of life. It may be just right around the corner.

Now I want to say again that knowledge, though it is very, very important, is not going to do you any good in passing this test. Do you know the difference between wisdom and knowledge? Some people think they’re the same, but they are not. You see, knowledge is learned; wisdom is given. Knowledge comes from studying; wisdom comes from meditation on the Word of God. Knowledge comes by looking around; wisdom comes by looking up. Knowledge will fail you; wisdom will not fail you. A man may have a lot of knowledge and not have wisdom.

As a matter of fact, last night I found a verse that was interesting to me. It was Job chapter 32, verse 9, and just jot it in your margin, but here’s what it says: “Great men are not always wise” (Job 32:9). That’s very interesting.

You know, there have been some very great men. Let’s think for example about President Nixon. I think President Nixon was a great man, but I certainly would say there were some areas in which he was not wise. “Great men are not always wise.” It is possible that a man may have all kinds of knowledge and yet he does not know wisdom.

Einstein was a great man. He was a brilliant man. He died in 1955. But do you know what Einstein said? And I quote—he said, “I feel like a man chained. If I could only be free from the shackles of my intellectual smallness, then I could understand the universe in which I live.” But he was dead wrong. If you were to double his IQ, triple his IQ, and quadruple his IQ, he would still not understand the universe in which he lived. He thought that if you had a bigger brain, he thought that he could learn more, he could understand it and the world.

But that is not true. The Bible says, “The world by wisdom [knows] not God” (1 Corinthians 1:21), that is, by intellectual wisdom, by knowledge, by man’s wisdom. But God reveals these things through His Spirit (1 Corinthians 2:10)—spiritual wisdom.

Look, for example, to 1 Corinthians chapter 1 for a moment. We’re going to be using a lot of Scripture this morning, so lets just get started early, and turn, if you will, to 1 Corinthians chapter 1. I want you to notice something here. First Corinthians chapter 1, beginning in verse 18: “For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness;”—that Christ Jesus died for our sins, the unsaved man, he curls the lip at that—“but unto us which are saved it is the power of God. For it is written, I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent. Where is the wise?”—that is, the earthly wise—“where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world?”—he’s talking about the wise of this world—“hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God be the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.” Not foolish preaching, but the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe. “For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdom: but we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumblingblock, and unto the Greeks foolishness; but unto them which are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God” (1 Corinthians 1:18–24).

I wish Einstein could have known that: Christ, the power of God; Christ, the wisdom of God. No man will ever know true wisdom until he knows Jesus Christ, who is the wisdom of God.

Now what is wisdom? Knowledge is the accumulation of facts. But what is wisdom? Wisdom is seeing life from God’s point of view—wisdom is seeing life from God’s point of view. Wisdom is practical insight into the ways of God. You know, Moses, in Exodus chapter 33, verses 12 through 15, prayed a very unusual prayer. God was getting ready for Moses to do something marvelous and wonderful and to lead His people, and Moses said, “God, show me thy way—show me thy way.” And the Bible says in Psalm 103 and verse 7 that God “made known his ways unto Moses, [and] his acts …”—a-c-t-s—“his acts unto the children of Israel” (Psalm 103:7). There were two levels of understanding. The Jewish children of Israel, they saw the acts of God; they saw what God was doing. But Moses knew the ways of God. Moses knew why God was doing it. They had knowledge, and Moses had wisdom. Wisdom is understanding the ways of God. Wisdom is seeing life from God’s point of view.

Now as you study that Old Testament passage of Scripture and the things that followed, those children of Israel followed Moses around through the wilderness, 40 years they were out there. And God said He was doing it as a test, exactly the same thing that James is talking about, being tested. And they flunked the test ignominiously and miserably. They were always murmuring and complaining—in the vernacular, bellyaching—all the time, talking about why this, and why is that. All they could see was what God was doing. All they could see was the acts of God, and if God would bless them. And they were going through the Red Sea dry shod. Oh, they were singing the song of Moses and the Lamb (Revelation 15:3). They were praising Moses. Everything was so fine and good. Then the first thing you know they got out there somewhere and there didn’t seem to be any water, there didn’t seem to be any bread, and oh, how they murmured, and how they scolded, and how they chided. All they knew was what God was doing, but they never understood why God was doing it. They, ladies and gentleman, saw the acts of God but they never saw the ways of God.

Do you know what wisdom is? Wisdom is knowing the ways of God. Wisdom is seeing life from God’s point of view. And how important it is that you need to see and learn to see light from God’s point of view.

Now if you don’t, you’re going to be complaining and fussing; you’re not going to be blessed. You see, they were not blessed because they did not obey. There is no blessing without obedience. But wait a minute: there will be no obedience unless there’s trust. But wait a minute: there will be no trust unless there is love. But wait a minute: there will be no love unless there is knowledge. But wait a minute: there will be no knowledge, real knowledge, unless there’s wisdom. You see, to know God is to love Him, and then to love Him is to trust Him, and to trust Him is to obey Him, and to obey Him is to be blessed. But dear friend, it all begins with wisdom, to pray as Moses prayed, “Lord, show me thy way,” or as James taught us to pray, “If any [among] you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him” (James 1:5).

Listen to me this morning, friend. The test is coming, the trials are coming, and if all you see is what God is doing and you don’t learn to see life from God’s point of view, you’re going to fail the test of life, you’re not going to be able to count it all joy.

Now if you want me to pray for you this morning, what would you ask me to pray for you for? Well, let me tell you what Paul thinks that we need to be prayed for. Turn, if you will, to Ephesians, for example, chapter 1, and let’s see what Paul prayed for the church at Ephesus. Ephesians chapter 1, begin in verse 15—Paul says, “Wherefore I also, after I heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus,”—that is, when I heard you got saved—“and love unto all the saints, cease not to give thanks for you, making mention of you in my prayers;”—now watch it; here’s what he prayed—“that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him” (Ephesians 1:15–17). That’s what Paul thought was very important for the saints at Ephesus. I want to tell you that’s what Paul thinks is very important for the saints in Memphis, Tennessee.

Now just go right on through the Book of Philippians to the Book of Colossians chapter 1 for a moment; just turn right and go to Colossians chapter 1, verse 9. Let us see what Paul thought was important for the saints at Colossae. He says, “For this cause we also, since the day we heard of it,”—talking about their faith—“do not cease to pray for you, and to desire that ye might be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding” (Colossians 1:9). Paul said, “I prayed for you, I prayed for you, I prayed for you, that you might have wisdom, that you might have wisdom, that you might have wisdom, that you might have wisdom.” It is wisdom, ladies and gentleman, that we need.

Now having said all of that by way of introduction, let’s go back to our passage here and think about how to pray for wisdom. Here’s what James tells us after he warns us about the tests of life that are coming, and after he’s telling us that it’s wisdom and not knowledge that will cause us to pass that test. I want you to see what James says. I want to read it again here in verse 5: “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord. A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.”

Now there are three things that James tells us here about how to pray for wisdom, and I pray God today that He’ll help me to transfer them from my heart to your heart.

I. The Freedom to Pray

First of all, James speaks of the freedom to pray—the freedom to pray. Notice the gracious invitation in verse 5: “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God,”—notice again the freedom—“that giveth to all men liberally,”—and notice again—“and upbraideth not.” That means He won’t scold you for asking. Do you know what this literally says? Now we don’t translate it this way, but “you let him ask a giving God.” Do you know that kind of a God? Hallelujah! Praise God! He is a giving God, and the Bible says, “Let him ask the giving God.” He’s not the selfish God, not the stingy God, not the God of the clenched fist; He is the giving God. That’s the way He wants Himself designated in the Word of God.

Someone has well said that prayer is not overcoming God’s reluctance; prayer is laying hold of God with willingness. It’s God who invites us to come and wants us to come. Somehow we get the idea that prayer is talking God into doing something that He ordinarily wouldn’t want to do, that prayer is sort of twisting God’s arm behind His back until finally we get God to come grudgingly and give us what we need. But the Bible says here He is the giving God. Oh, how He encourages us to ask. He’s not going to scold us. We say, “God, I need wisdom.” He’s not going to say, “What did you say? Are you pestering me again? Do you mean to say that you’re coming to me one more time and asking me for wisdom? Shame on you!” Oh no, no, no! James says He won’t scold us. He’s not going to chide us; He’s not going to upbraid us for asking. Let him ask. He giveth to all men liberally, cheerfully.

Thou art coming to a King,

Large petitions with thee bring;

For his grace and power are such,

None can ever ask too much. (John Newton)

He is the giving God.

And so He’s the one who invites you, and when the trials of life come, you don’t need to go around wringing your hands; you need to be bending your knees. He talks of the trials of life, and then he says, “If any of you lack wisdom to pass this test, then ask of God.” And oh, you have the freedom to pray to God. Did you know the devil knows that you have this freedom but he doesn’t want you to know it? Now the devil doesn’t want your prayers to be answered. Now I want you to pay attention to this, and if you don’t get anything else that I’ve said today, I pray God that you’ll get this. The devil knows that he can’t keep God from answering your prayers, so he tries to keep you from asking them, see? That’s what the devil does. He can’t keep God from answering, so he does the next best thing: he tries to keep you from asking those prayers. But the Bible says, “Let him ask God, that gives liberally to all men, and it shall be given him.”

Oh, you read there in the Bible when the Lord Jesus Christ died in agony and blood upon that cross. The Bible says that the veil of the temple was torn from top to bottom. That veil of the temple separated the holy place from the Holy of Holies, and in that Holy of Holies dwelt the glory of God, and only the high priest could go once a year with a basin of blood. But when Jesus died, that veil was rent from top to bottom, not from bottom to top as though some man had done it, but top to bottom as God had done it. And the way is made into the Holy of Holies, and that’s the reason the writer of the Book of Hebrews says in Hebrews chapter 4, verse 16, “Let us come boldly to the throne of grace” (Hebrews 4:16). What does that mean? It means because Jesus Christ has died upon the cross, the veil is rent, we have instant access, and we have constant access into the Holy of Holies. Instantly, constantly, the Lord is saying, “Let him ask, let him ask, let him ask.”

The devil wants to keep you from praying for wisdom today. But I want to tell you with the function and unction of my soul that you have the function. Incidentally, talking about unction, that’s what wisdom is. Wisdom is function: function with unction. That’s what it is. Wisdom—God gives you the ability to that spiritual function so that you can function with the unction that God gives. God is offering Himself to you. He will not scold, but He will freely hear your prayer.

II. The Faith to Pray

Second thing: not only is there the freedom to pray, but along with that freedom to pray there must be the faith to pray. Look in verse 6. It says, “But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering.” “Let him ask in faith.” Why is this so important? Hebrews 11, verse 6, says, “But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him” (Hebrews 11:6). Oh, how you must pray in faith! Jesus is speaking—Matthew 21, verse 22: “All things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive” (Matthew 21:22). Jot this one down: Mark chapter 11 and verse 24: “Therefore I say unto you …”—and again Jesus is speaking—“Therefore I say unto you, What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them” (Mark 11:24). Do you know what we say around here? “Pray, believe, you’ll receive; pray in doubt, you’ll do without.”

Now James says, “Let him ask in faith—let him ask in faith.” Along with that freedom to pray must come the faith to pray. I want to make a point. I hope I don’t confuse you. But he doesn’t say, “Pray with faith”; he says, “Pray in faith.” Faith is not some sort of an additive, sort of a heavenly sort that you shake in to make your prayers run more smoothly. No, no, no, no! You don’t pray with faith; you pray in faith. You say, “What’s the difference?” Well, don’t get the idea that you just get a list of things out here that you want and then you sprinkle a little foo foo dust over it called faith, and then it’s a fact, whatever you want is yours because you prayed with faith. Oh, no, no, no! It says to pray in faith.

What does it mean to pray in faith? What is the difference? Well, you see when God wants to do something for you, when God has something that He desires for you, God places the faith in your heart so that you should pray for it. The faith that you have in your heart is the evidence that God wants to do that thing for you.

For example, those people who are watching this television program right now, the television program that you see is the evidence of the television station. The program doesn’t bring the station into being; the station brings the program into being.

Now our faith does not bring things into being; things bring our faith into being. You see, when God wants to do something for us, that fact is already settled in the heart and mind of God, and the Bible says, “Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen” (Hebrews 11:1). Even though you can’t see it, the evidence is there. Because it is there, it is substance; it is real. Faith is substance; it is real, spiritual steel and concrete in it. And so I hope I’m not confusing you.

I told the earlier congregation I felt that I got my foot in a bucket about this time in this message, and maybe it got a little confusing, but it’s very important that you understand that the Bible says that we pray in faith. That is, when we know that God wants us to have something, do something, be something, then God puts that faith in our hearts. Then we pray in faith and it is done. And you see, “Faith [comes] by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17).

Now I know that I can ask God for wisdom and have it, because He’s made a clear immutable, unbreakable promise to me in the Word of God. “If any of you”—that’s me—“lack wisdom,”—that’s me again—“let him”—that’s me again—“ask of God … and it shall be given him.” And so I can say, when I need wisdom, when my heart is right, and when I come before God, I can say, “Dear Lord, I am praying in faith for what you promised. And I’m claiming it on the authority of your Word.” Not just praying with faith; I’m praying in faith. I’m praying as God wants me to pray, because God has given me something with which to pray. My prayer, therefore, issues from my faith. It’s not faith that just simply is sprinkled over my prayer. It’s not, “Believe it and it will be true”; it means, “It is true, so therefore believe it.” “Faith [comes] by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.”

Now it’s very important that you understand that, because we’ve got some folks going around today saying, “Name it and claim it.” No, friend, God names it so you can claim it. And right here, God names it—God names it. God says, “If you need wisdom, ask God, and it will be given to you, but just ask in faith.”

And so first of all, there is the freedom to pray. But along with that freedom to pray for wisdom there comes that faith to pray for wisdom. And “faith [comes] by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.” And so since God has promised we can pray with faith, we can ask God, we can believe, we can receive, and therefore we can achieve, because God Himself has promised it.

III. The Firmness to Pray

All right now, thirdly—thirdly—not only must there be that freedom to pray, and not only must there be that faith to pray, but then along with it there must come that firmness to pray. Look again in verse 6: “But let him ask in faith,”—now notice that next phrase—“nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord. A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.” James says the double-minded man, it’s not that he’s just not going to get wisdom; he’s not going to get anything. “Let not that man think that he shall receive any thing from the Lord.”

So far as I can find, James is the only one in the Bible who uses this phrase, “double minded,” the “double minded man.” Now I’ve seen illustrations of double-mindedness all through the Bible, but this phrase is unique, I believe, with Brother James. Do you know what it literally means? Literally, it means two souls—two souls—a man with two souls. Here’s a man trying to face both ways at the same time. Here’s a man who’s a spiritual soul. Here’s a man who is double-minded. Here’s a man who is unstable. He’s not going to receive anything from the Lord. He’s trying to hold on to the world with one hand; he’s trying to hold on to God with the other hand.

It reminds me of the fellow up on the Mason-Dixon line, didn’t know whether he wanted to belong to Confederacy or the Union, so he put on gray trousers and a blue coat. Poor guy got shot in the pants and the back.

A double-minded, unstable, good Lord, good devil type of guy. James says, “Let not that man think that he shall receive any thing from the Lord.” There must be this resoluteness; there must be this firmness to pray.

You know, I found a verse last night; I just went in my study last night and got alone and God showed me a verse. I don’t believe I’d ever even noticed it before, but I want to share it with you. Isaiah chapter 29—turn to it, Isaiah chapter 29—very interesting verse, dealing with this subject of being two-souled, facing both ways at the same time. Isaiah chapter 29—look, beginning in verse 11: “And the vision of all is become unto you as the words of a book that is sealed …”—that is, God’s revelation of all that He’s doing and all He wants to do is to some people like a sealed book. Is that the way the Bible is to you when you try to read it sometimes—like a sealed book? “And the vision of all is become unto you as the words of a book that is sealed, which men deliver to one that is learned, saying, Read this, I pray thee: and he saith, I cannot; for it is sealed.” You bring this book to a man, he has his PhD, he has all the accoutrements of learning, he knows all of the languages: “Read it.” He says, “I can’t read it; it’s a sealed book.” And then verse 12: “And the book is delivered to him that is not learned, saying, Read this, I pray thee: and he saith, I am not learned.” “I can’t read it either. I can’t decipher; I can’t make it out.” And there are so many people who are coming to the Bible with exactly this problem. The Bible to them is a closed book; it is a sealed book. It’s like a scholar: he has all of the learning, but his book is sealed. Or it’s like a man who’s never learned how to read and he can’t even make sense out of the words. All it is, is just marking on paper. He doesn’t understand it. Why is this? Well, continue to read here in verse 13: “Wherefore the Lord said, Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth, and with their lips do honour me,”—but now watch it—“but have removed their heart far from me, and their fear toward me is taught by the precept of men:”—that is, it’s only something that they’ve heard about; they don’t really know—“therefore, behold, I will proceed to do a marvellous work among this people, even a marvellous work and a wonder: for the wisdom of their wise men shall perish, and the understanding of their prudent men shall be hid” (Isaiah 29:11–14).

God says, “I’m going to judge you. Your wise men, their wisdom will be as naught. The understanding of your scholars is going. It evaporates. You’re not going to know, and you’re not going to perceive my ways; you’re not going to understand life from my point of view.” And why? Well, reason is very simple. Look in verse 13 again: “Wherefore the Lord said, Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth, and their lips do honour me, but have removed their heart far from me.” Do you know what that is? That’s a double-minded man. That is a double minded man. He says one thing with his mouth; he says something else with his heart.

Jesus said, “There is a people that honors me with their lips, but their heart is far from me” (Matthew 15:8; Mark 7:6). These spiritual souls are not going to receive anything from the Lord. They’re double-minded. They’re unstable in all of their ways. Their life is like a spiritual storm center. They’re driven and tossed with the winds. They waver. They’re hot and cold. They blow hot, blow cold, good Lord, good devil, wishy washy, on again, off again, type of people. No wonder they don’t receive anything from the Lord. Oh, friend, let me tell you something. If you possess wisdom, wisdom must possess you. You must mean business with God.

Thank God there’s the freedom to pray: God, the giving God, invites you to pray. Thank God there’s the faith to pray: for we have a promise from the Word of God. But there must be the firmness to pray: “Let him ask in faith, nothing wavering.” The reason that many of us do not get our prayers answered is that we are not single-minded. I was reading again in the Sermon on the Mount last night where Jesus said, “If your eye be single, then your body will be full of light” (Matthew 6:22; Luke 11:34). Do you know what a body full of light is? That’s wisdom. “If your eye is single—if your eye is single—then your body will be full of light.”

Can you say with the Apostle Paul, “This one thing I do” (Philippians 3:13)? You see, we’re to be single in our determination. We’re to be single in our desire. Do you want wisdom? Let me give you a verse. Jot it down; read it when you get home—Proverbs chapter 3, verses 13 through 15. You’re going to find out there that wisdom is compared to rubies and diamonds and emeralds and precious gems. When you start seeking wisdom as you search for gold and rubies and diamonds—or let’s translate that into dollar bills—then you’re going to find wisdom—when you’re single-minded. You see, we need to be single in our desire, single in our determination, single in our devotion. Jesus said, “No man can serve two masters” (Matthew 6:24). You just can’t do it. You’re double-minded, and because of that you’ll be unstable in all of your ways. You’re like a wave; the wind just blows you about.

Years ago, I read a story about a knight back in the days of Camelot, back in the days of the crusades, when they had knights in shining armor. This knight upon his white horse saw a beautiful girl—she was a vision of loveliness. He rode up to her and he said, “Oh, you are the loveliest lady upon the face of the earth. Your beauty is exquisite, without parallel. I desire to have you for my wife. And if you but marry me, I will give you my full heart’s devotion. I will love you. I will serve you. I will honor you. I will protect you. I will be faithful to you till death. You are the most lovely of all of the ladies, the fairest of the fair.” “Oh,” she said, “handsome, for this promise of love, thank you; for this promise of devotion, thank you; for this promise of faithfulness. But before I say yes, in all honesty I must tell you, you’ve not yet seen my sister who is even more fair, even more lovely, even more desirable, than I.” “Oh,” he said, “it is impossible.” “No,” she said, “my sister is exquisitely beautiful; you must look at her first.” “Well,” he said, “where is she?” She said, “Right over the hill.” So the knight on his white horse goes riding over the hill and he sees the sister, and then he comes back, and he says, “Oh no, no, no, she’s not nearly so fair as thou art. You’re the one I desire. You’re the one I want to marry. You are the fairest of the fair. I will be true to thee. I want thee for my wife.” She said, “You will not have me.” And he said, “Why?” She said, “You said that I was the fairest of the fair, and you would be true to me till death, and at my first suggestion you rode off to look at another woman.”

“O Lord Jesus, I love thee. O Lord Jesus, I would be true to thee till death. Whom have I on earth but thee?” And then the devil comes and dangles some dainty before us, and off we go—double-minded, unstable in all our ways. Is it any wonder that the Lord cannot commit Himself to us—because we will not commit ourselves to Him?

Conclusion

James says that we need wisdom. There is the freedom to pray. There is the faith to pray. But there must be the firmness to pray, nothing wavering. “He that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed.” “A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.” What will happen when we let go of this world with both hands and take hold of Jesus Christ with both hands? I tell you, God will be giving us wisdom. We’ll know the ways of God. We’ll be meeting the trials of life. We’ll be overcoming those trials. We’ll count it all joy when we fall into divers temptations. And people will look at us, and they’ll say, “What makes those people different?” And they’ll know it’s Jesus—they’ll know it’s Jesus. Single in our devotion, single in our determination, single, and not double-minded—single-minded. “This one thing I do.”

 Rogers, A. (2017). Praying for Wisdom. In Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive (Jas 1:1–8). Signal Hill, CA: Rogers Family Trust.

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